Veterans Day Event

Wed, 10/16/2013 - 8:42am

Posted in: Tidewater Jewish Foundation, Special Events

1492 Monday, Nov. 11, 11 am

When the nation celebrates Veterans Day, a solemn ceremony will also take place at the Jewish Veterans Memorial on the Sandler Family Campus of the Tidewater Jewish community.

Now three years old, the memorial was created through significant donations, as well as by the purchase of pavers inscribed with the names of Jewish veterans who served in the past as well as those currently serving in the Armed Forces. Veterans from Russia, Canada and Israel are also honored.
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Stein family endows the Stein Family College Scholarship

Wed, 10/09/2013 - 7:51am

Posted in: Tidewater Jewish Foundation, Planned Giving

1486 The generosity of a few can impact the lives of generations to come. Case in point—the Stein family, which is helping Jewish students from throughout Hampton Roads fulfill their dreams of a quality college education.

Five years ago, the family established the Stein Family College Scholarship through the Tidewater Jewish Foundation. The Scholarship was renewed annually, and ensured that each year a deserving college student would receive $10,000 to help offset tuition and other expenses; students could continue to receive the scholarship throughout their college careers by maintaining a level of academic excellence. Read more »

Seven Anxieties about Asking for Money And What to Do about Them

Wed, 08/21/2013 - 8:36am

Posted in: Tidewater Jewish Foundation, Planned Giving

1474 It’s been said over and over in a thousand different ways: fundraising is not about money – it’s about relationships.  But still, the vast majority of people who have not earned their Major Gifts Cultivation badge get snagged by various forms of anxiety about money.  If we can name some of those anxieties, maybe we can disempower them, so we can get back to talking about relationships.  Here are seven that I have heard frequently.
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How-To Celebrate the High Holidays 5774/2013 in Tidewater

Fri, 08/16/2013 - 2:31pm

Posted in: Shalom Tidewater

The How-To Live Jewishly in Tidewater blog will feature posts throughout the year with information about Jewish life in Tidewater. Articles will discuss topics such as how-to celebrate the holidays in Tidewater, how-to keep kosher in Tidewater, how-to give back in Tidewater, and more! Feel free to contact Rebecca Bickford, Community Concierge, if there is something specific that you would like more information on.

1473 The High Holidays are a whirlwind of culture, spiritual revival, and community. Preparations begin more than a week ahead of time to ensure that enough food is prepared and enough beds are made. Family and friends travel, sometimes great distances, to reunite with one another for this most holy of times. We congregate as a People, led by our Rabbis, Cantors, and religious leaders, to reconcile ourselves with G-d, rejuvenate our souls, and rekindle our faith. We rise early before the sun to begin our Fast – we suffer through hunger pains as a reminder of our past transgressions. We suffer so that we may not only cleanse ourselves, but to repent for those transgressions with the promise of “never again.” We do this together, as a People, because on this Holiest of days, we must band together under His guidance, support one another, and nurture the delicate future of our children.

Now, dim the lights, sound the shofar, and ask… how can you celebrate the High Holidays in Tidewater?
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Meet the Christians who Stand with Israel

Thu, 04/18/2013 - 8:24am

1434 On April 23rd Christians United for Israel (CUFI), in partnership with the United Jewish Federation of Tidewater, CBN, and The Rock Church International, will hold a Night to Honor Israel at the Rock Church. The event will feature Dr. Pat Robertson and CUFI executive director David Brog.

CUFI is the largest pro-Israel organization in the United States. We have more than 1.2 million members and hold an average of 40 events each month. And yet, there are many in the Jewish community who have heard little if anything about our organization.

CUFI exists to unite Christians in support of Israel. For decades, as Christians across the country began to focus increasingly on the Hebrew Bible, individual churches came to the conclusion that it is our Christian duty to stand with Israel. We see in passages such as Genesis 12:3, which mandates that we bless Israel, and Psalm 122:6, which commands us to “pray for the peace of Jerusalem,” a clear message: Christians must be Zionists. 
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How-To Celebrate Pesach 5773/2013 in Tidewater

Mon, 03/11/2013 - 8:16am

Posted in: Shalom Tidewater

The How-To Live Jewishly in Tidewater blog will feature posts throughout the year with information about Jewish life in Tidewater. Articles will discuss topics such as how-to celebrate the holidays in Tidewater, how-to keep kosher in Tidewater, how-to give back in Tidewater, and more! Feel free to contact Rebecca Bickford, Community Concierge, if there is something specific that you would like more information on.

1285 The story of Passover is one that we learn at a very early age. This is the story of our Exodus from the land of Egypt after suffering as Pharaoh's slaves for generations.

Moses, a man who is raised in Pharaoh's palace as a son, learns he is of Jewish heritage. He looks out over the land of Egypt and sees his people enslaved, beaten, hungry, and suffering. He decides to join them in the mud pits, toiling under the unforgiving sun.

Pharaoh attempts to entice Moses back into the comfort of the palace but Moses is steadfast in his decision. Moses implores Pharaoh to let the Jewish slaves go. He warns Pharaoh that God is on his side and he must obey Moses' request for freedom.

Pharaoh ignores Moses, and soon the first of ten plagues is set upon the land of Egypt. It is the final plague that brings mighty Pharaoh to his knees -- the killing of all Egyptian firstborn.

Moses warns to the slaves to smear lambs blood at the threshold of their homes effectively telling the Angel of Death to "pass over" this house and spare the child. When the Angel of Death reaches the son of Pharaoh, Pharaoh demands the Jews leave his land.

With no time to spare, the Jews pack up their meager lives, strap everything to their backs, and begin the long journey toward freedom. Their bread, not given the proper time to rise, bakes flat on their backs under the desert sun. Matzah, the unleavened bread, is an important component during Seders, as it represents the haste of the Jews, the heat of the desert, the desperation, and the lure of freedom.

As the Jews travel from Egypt, they are met with one more obstacle. The Red Sea.

This great expanse of water seemed to barricade the Jews from reaching their land of milk and honey, their freedom. Once more, God intervenes and splits the Red Sea. The waters draw back, allowing safe passage for the Jews to the other side.

As the last Jewish foot touched the opposite bank, the Red Sea converges on the Pharaoh's men who are in pursuit. Still, freedom is not yet achieved.

For 40 years, our ancestors traveled through the desert following the leadership of Moses until finally, they reached the land that is now called Israel.

The word "Israel" can be loosely translated to mean "struggle". Each year during Passover, we are reminded of the struggle of our ancestors. Their daily dose of bondage that nearly lasted a lifetime. We remember their courage to stand up to a mighty Egypt and their courage to follow a man who, for most of his life, walked side by side with the very whips that scarred their backs.

The struggle of the Jewish people did not begin or end in Egypt. It did not end with the slaves safely on the opposite bank of the Red Sea. The struggle defines our people, warms our Jewish hearts, and propels us forward through hundreds of years of oppression, nationalism, and ultimately, peace without borders.

So what’s happening in Tidewater this Passover?
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How-To Celebrate Purim (5773/2013) in Tidewater

Mon, 02/18/2013 - 10:49am

Posted in: Shalom Tidewater

The How-To Live Jewishly in Tidewater blog will feature posts throughout the year with information about Jewish life in Tidewater. Articles will discuss topics such as how-to celebrate the holidays in Tidewater, how-to keep kosher in Tidewater, how-to give back in Tidewater, and more! Feel free to contact Rebecca Bickford, Community Concierge, if there is something specific that you would like more information on.

1285 Purim, celebrated on the 14th day of Adar (February 24, 2013), honors Queen Esther, who saved the Jews from the evil Haman in the Book of Esther, also known as the Megillah. Communities across the Jewish world are gearing up for the most festive and joyous of all Jewish holidays. During Purim, children and adults dress up in costumes and masks as they enjoy the carnival-like celebrations and delicious feasts. There are a few customs that come with Purim including mishloach manot, the reading of the Megillah, and of course, delicious hamentashen. Mishloach manot or “sending of portions” is the act of sending food and drinks to friends, family, co-workers, neighbors, and other persons as well as providing gifts to the poor.

This holiday is a rambunctious celebration of triumph. From Jewish homes across the globe to synagogues full of congregants, the collective sound of thousands of groggers--noisemakers used to “drown out” the sound of the evil Haman’s name--can be heard loud and clear. In-between the sound of the groggers and the costume contests, we feast on hamentashen -- the traditional tri-cornered shortbread treat designed to resemble Haman's hat. Hamantashen can be found with a variety of fillings including chocolate, apricot, raspberry, poppy and more! Some shops are stepping up their Hamantashen game this year to include trendy flavors such as goat cheese and pesto.

Whatever your flavor, put on your costume, enjoy some hamentashen and ask yourself…

So, how can I celebrate Purim in Tidewater?
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Racking Up Flight Time

Tue, 02/05/2013 - 10:57am

1342 Jewish Women’s Salon Live invites all women in the Jewish community to Who’s Your Esther?, a facilitated discussion about the women who’ve inspired us, moved us, and helped make us the people we are today. Farideh Goldin, Director of Jewish Studies at Old Dominion University will lead an interactive presentation on Sunday, February 17 from 10 - 11:30 AM at the Sandler Family Campus of the Tidewater Jewish Community, 5000 Corporate Woods Dr, Virginia Beach

For inspiration in thinking about your own Esther, read the below (originally published in 614 HBI ezine) about a woman who refused to accept the idea that “women can’t.”

Racking Up Flight Time
Lisa Stein had no intention of following the military's existing rule that women could not fly combat missions—and accrued over 1,800 hours of combat flight time.

At the National Museum of Jewish History in Washington, D.C., there is currently a wonderful exhibit called "Women in the Military: A Jewish Perspective," that profiles Jewish female veterans of U.S. conflicts from the Civil War to the Gulf War. The purpose of this exhibit is to showcase the numerous contributions Jewish women have made to America's war efforts throughout history. Below is the story of Lisa Stein from Florida, a very determined veteran. (Article is courtesy of the National Museum of American Jewish Military History.)

 In 1983, Lisa Stein of Plantation, Florida, obtained a military scholarship to attend the University of Miami because she "thought it sounded like fun and they would foot the bill for school." Upon graduation in 1987, Lisa was commissioned into the United States Air Force.
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A Sorority from Scratch

Wed, 01/23/2013 - 12:32pm

1342 Jewish Women’s Salon Live invites all women in the Jewish community to Who’s Your Esther?, a facilitated discussion about the women who’ve inspired us, moved us, and helped make us the people we are today. Farideh Goldin, Director of Jewish Studies at Old Dominion University will lead an interactive presentation on Sunday, February 17 from 10 - 11:30 AM at the Sandler Family Campus of the Tidewater Jewish Community, 5000 Corporate Woods Dr, Virginia Beach

For inspiration in thinking about your own Esther, read the below (originally published in 614 HBI ezine) about a woman who refused to accept limits for herself and her fellow women.

A Sorority from Scratch
A college student fights exclusion by creating a sorority that honors differences.

by Lois Greene Stone

When I went to college in the mid-1950s, there were an overwhelming number of regulations women were expected to follow. Co-eds were required to adhere to dress codes, such as wearing skirts six days a week (pants were permitted only on Saturday afternoons). There were social 'teas,' for which white gloves actually had to be carried. Curfew was enforced, 10:30 p.m. on weeknights, midnight on Saturday, and each girl had to sign out (in a ledger) the time she was leaving a dorm, where she could be located, and then sign in upon return.
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How-To Celebrate Tu B’shevat (5773/2013) in Tidewater

Mon, 01/14/2013 - 12:15pm

Posted in: Shalom Tidewater

The How-To Live Jewishly in Tidewater blog will feature posts throughout the year with information about Jewish life in Tidewater. Articles will discuss topics such as how-to celebrate the holidays in Tidewater, how-to keep kosher in Tidewater, how-to give back in Tidewater, and more! Feel free to contact Rebecca Bickford, Community Concierge, if there is something specific that you would like more information on.

1285 “The best time to plant a tree is twenty years ago. The second best time is now.”
-Anonymous

Tu B'shevat is a day we celebrate the New Year for Trees. It is during this season that trees begin to bloom in Israel and as they bloom, so begins a new life cycle of fruit.

In the past, it is this fresh cycle of fruit that was celebrated. We live in a modern world, one where we are not reliant on new seasons to bring about fresh fruits to sustain us. We live in a world where everything we require - food, information, companionship - is available at the click of a button. As our world continues to grow and change, we must remind ourselves of the simple things and return to our roots.

Consider all of the things a tree can provide: shade, sustenance, and nearness to water. The abundance of life is unlimited and with each cycle of life, seeds drop to the ground or are carried away by wind. These seeds settle in the earth, drink the rain, and grow into new life; starting the cycle anew. As we grow and learn, so too must we scatter our seeds to the wind - seeds of hope, peace, and new life. We must become the Tree: wise, deeply rooted, and giving. We must become the branches, sharing our shade and distributing our fruit to the youth; telling stories of old, explaining profound lessons, and encouraging new beginnings. Our children are the fruit, fresh and tender with the season, clinging to our branches until they are ready to venture out on their own.

This Tu B'shevat, consider your new year's resolution. Now, consider a resolution for the Trees. How can you deepen your roots, expand your branches, or strengthen the power of your fruit?

So how can you celebrate Tu B'shevat this year?
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